Showing posts with label Objective C. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Objective C. Show all posts

Monday, August 29, 2016

Localization in iOS apps made simple


Localizing iOS apps with the standard tools is tedious, especially when you use Interface Builder files. To resolve that, I have created a new tool called AGi18n that makes it extremely easy. But let's first start by analyzing the existing approaches for it together with their problems, to later introduce the library and all the goodies that you get from it.

✔ Read More...

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Monday, August 17, 2015

How to convert a decimal number to binary in Swift?


You can convert the decimal value to a human-readable binary representation using the String initializer that takes a radix parameter:

let num = 22
let str = String(num, radix: 2)
println(str) // prints "10110"

If you wanted to, you could also pad it with any number of zeroes pretty easily as well:

func pad(string : String, toSize: Int) -> String {
    var padded = string
    for i in 0..<toSize - countElements(string) {
        padded = "0" + padded
    }
    return padded
}

let num = 22
let str = String(num, radix: 2)
println(str) // 10110
pad(str, 8)  // 00010110

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What is the difference between -viewWillAppear: and -viewDidAppear:?


In general, this is what I do:

1) ViewDidLoad - Whenever I'm adding controls to a view that should appear together with the view, right away, I put it in the ViewDidLoad method. Basically this method is called whenever the view was loaded into memory. So for example, if my view is a form with 3 labels, I would add the labels here; the view will never exist without those forms.

2) ViewWillAppear: I use ViewWillAppear usually just to update the data on the form. So, for the example above, I would use this to actually load the data from my domain into the form. Creation of UIViews is fairly expensive, and you should avoid as much as possible doing that on the ViewWillAppear method, becuase when this gets called, it means that the iPhone is already ready to show the UIView to the user, and anything heavy you do here will impact performance in a very visible manner (like animations being delayed, etc).

3) ViewDidAppear: Finally, I use the ViewDidAppear to start off new threads to things that would take a long time to execute, like for example doing a webservice call to get extra data for the form above.The good thing is that because the view already exists and is being displayed to the user, you can show a nice "Waiting" message to the user while you get the data.

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Looking to understand the iOS UIViewController lifecycle


All these commands are called automatically at the appropriate times by iOS when you load/present/hide the view controller. It's important to note that these methods are attached to UIViewController and not to UIViews themselves. You won't get any of these features just using a UIView.

There's great documentation on Apple's site here. Putting in simply though:
  1. ViewDidLoad - Called when you create the class and load from xib. Great for initial setup and one-time-only work.
  2. ViewWillAppear - Called right before your view appears, good for hiding/showing fields or any operations that you want to happen every time before the view is visible. Because you might be going back and forth between views, this will be called every time your view is about to appear on the screen.
  3. ViewDidAppear - Called after the view appears - great place to start an animations or the loading of external data from an API.
  4. ViewWill/DidDisappear - Same idea as WillAppear.
  5. ViewDidUnload/ViewDidDispose - In Objective C, this is where you do your clean-up and release of stuff, but this is handled automatically so not much you really need to do here.
The UIViewController lifecycle is diagrammed here:




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How to set iPhone UI View z index?


UIView siblings are stacked in the order in which they are added to their superview. The UIView hierarchy methods and properties are there to manage view order. In UIView.h:

@property(nonatomic,readonly) UIView *superview;
@property(nonatomic,readonly,copy) NSArray *subviews;

- (void)removeFromSuperview;
- (void)insertSubview:(UIView *)view atIndex:(NSInteger)index;
- (void)exchangeSubviewAtIndex:(NSInteger)index1 withSubviewAtIndex:(NSInteger)index2;

- (void)addSubview:(UIView *)view;
- (void)insertSubview:(UIView *)view belowSubview:(UIView *)siblingSubview;
- (void)insertSubview:(UIView *)view aboveSubview:(UIView *)siblingSubview;

- (void)bringSubviewToFront:(UIView *)view;
- (void)sendSubviewToBack:(UIView *)view;

The sibling views are ordered back to front in the subviews array. So the topmost view will be:

[parentView.subviews lastObject];

and bottom view will be:

[parentView.subviews objectAtIndex:0];

[parentView bringSubviewToFront:view] will bring the view to the top, but this is only the case if the views are all siblings in the hierarchy.

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Wednesday, August 12, 2015

Storyboard Reference, Strong IBOutlet, Scene Dock in iOS 9


Apple has done some optimization in both Xib and Storyboard files. And because of this optimization, you can now define an IBOutlet as strong, instead of weak. Apple pointed this out at the last WWDC, so let's give a look at this in more details. You can find in the documentation the chapter Managing the Lifetimes of Objects from Nib Files:


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Monday, August 10, 2015

Swift vs. Objective-C: 10 reasons the future favors Swift


Programming languages don't die easily, but development shops that cling to fading paradigms do. If you're developing apps for mobile devices and you haven't investigated Swift, take note: Swift will not only supplant Objective-C when it comes to developing apps for the Mac, iPhone, iPad, Apple Watch, and devices to come, but it will also replace C for embedded programming on Apple platforms.


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Friday, August 7, 2015

iBeacons Tutorial with iOS and Swift


Have you ever wished that your phone could show your location inside a large building like a shopping mall or baseball stadium? Sure, GPS can give you an idea of which side of the building you are in. But good luck getting an accurate GPS signal in one of those steel and concrete sarcophaguses. What you need is something inside of the building to let your device determine its physical location. Enter iBeacons! In this iBeacons tutorial you'll create an app that lets you register known iBeacon emitters and tells you when your phone has moved outside of their range. The use case for this app is attaching an iBeacon emitter to your laptop bag, purse, or even your cat's collar — anything important you don't want to lose. Once your device moves outside the range of the emitter, your app detects this and notifies you. To continue with this tutorial, you'll need to test on a real iOS device and an iBeacon. If you don't have an iBeacon but have a second iOS device, you might be able to use it as a beacon; read on!


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Advances in Testing With Xcode 7 and Swift 2


In the early days of iOS, tools to facilitate testing were not a major focus of Apple's Developer Tools team. This has gradually changed over the years with the introduction of the XCTest framework and, more recently, support for asynchronous and performance testing. With Xcode 7 and Swift 2, Apple is taking another big leap to improve testing in Xcode. In this tutorial, I'm going to walk you through three significant additions that will make testing easier and more enjoyable.


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Thursday, August 6, 2015

How Not to Crash #3: NSNotification


In general, I prefer NSNotification to KVO and (especially) to bindings. I do use KVO sometimes — there are times when it's the most sensible thing. But NSNotification, like many older APIs, is easier to use without crashing.


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UIGestureRecognizer Tutorial: Creating Custom Recognizers


Custom gesture recognizers delight users by making apps feel unique and alive. If basic taps, pans, and rotations are the utility and pickup trucks of the iOS world, custom gesture recognizers are the flashy hot rods with custom paint jobs and hydraulics. Read this custom UIGestureRecognizer tutorial and learn all about gesture recognizers! In this tutorial you'll take a fun little "find the differences" game and make it interactive by adding a custom circle gesture recognizer to select the non-matching image. Along the way you'll learn:


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iOS9 Day-by-Day :: Day 2 :: UI Testing


Automated User Interface Testing is a valuable tool when developing any software application. It can detect problems with your app quickly, and a successful test suite run can provide you with confidence before a release. On the iOS platform, this is currently done using UIAutomation, with tests written in JavaScript. This involves opening up a separate app, Instruments, and creating and running scripts. The workflow is painfully slow and takes a long time to get used to.


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iOS9 Day-by-Day :: Day 5 :: Xcode Code Coverage Tools


Code coverage is a tool that helps you to measure the value of your unit tests. High levels of code coverage give you confidence in your tests and indicate that your application has been more thoroughly tested. You could have thousands of tests, but if they only test one of your many functions, then your unit test suite isn't that valuable at all! There's no ideal code coverage percentage that you should aim for. This will vary drastically depending your project. If your projects has a lot of visual components that you can't test, then the target figure will be a lot lower than if you're putting together a data processing framework, for example.


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Tuesday, July 7, 2015

Physics Joints in Unity 2D


The cross-platform game engine Unity has powerful support for creating 2D and 3D games. It's a great choice for aspiring game developers, since it works for most mobile, desktop and console platforms, and even better, it's free to use for lower-revenue developers and studios. One of the key components of Unity are physics joints, which let you create various connections between objects in Unity. Using joints, you can describe a connection between two objects, which means you can simulate the physics of almost any multi-part object you can think of, including doors, sliding platforms, chains or even wrecking balls! :] This tutorial will focus on using joints in Unity 2D, although Unity supports joints in its 3D engine as well.


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Thursday, July 2, 2015

Create a Native Apple Watch App for watchOS 2


At WWDC 2015, Apple announced the first major update to their Apple Watch platform, watchOS 2. Along with many new features and improvements, the most important aspect of this update for developers is the ability to create native Apple Watch apps. These native apps perform better and give developers access to new features, including the digital crown, microphone, and health sensors. In this tutorial, I will show you how to create a native WatchKit application and briefly outline some of the new APIs available in watchOS 2. I will also show you how to upgrade an existing non-native watchOS 1 app to a native watchOS 2 app.


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iOS 9: Staying Organized with Storyboard References


Even though storyboards have been around since iOS 5, many developers are reluctant to use them in their projects. A typical remark is that storyboards are great for small projects, but fall short for larger projects. Apple has taken this feedback to heart and resolved many common problems by introducing storyboard references. In this tutorial, I will show you what storyboard references are and how they can help you break down your project's user interfaces into manageable pieces.


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Wednesday, July 1, 2015

Objective-C WKWebView to JavaScript and Back


Since WKWebView doesn't yet show up as a drag-and-droppable view in Interface Builder, and other IB work-arounds cause the app to crash, a WKWebView instance is created in the ViewController's viewDidLoad method. The WKWebView instance is then sized to fill the entire view of the device. This can cause usability problems since the WKWebView's content now overlaps the header bar. If I was creating an app to ship, I would use Interface Builder to add a UIView, create an IBOutlet to that view, and size the UIView to fit the display portion of the screen. I would then add the WKWebView to the UIView I added using Interface Builder.


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Calling Objective-C Methods From JavaScript in a UIWebView


The East Coast Time Line app I've just finished building includes a 360-degree virtual reality panorama section, which puts you "inside" several of the coaches in the National Railway Museum's collection. It's created with the KRPano plugin that uses a set of tiles to build an HTML5 plugin that can be zoomed and rotated, either manually or with the aid of the device's gyroscope.


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Interfacing with a UIWebView from a UIViewController


If you are into iOS development chances are that you have already discovered (or been told) that UIWebView is a powerfully beast that can be used from more the displaying remote web content. In past projects I've relied heavily on UIWebView to display rich content format by using a local HTML file included in the main bundle (with external CSS and JS files also there). Doing so is straightforward, but sooner than later you might run into the issue of having to interface with what's running inside the UIWebView from Objective-C or vice-versa. Luckily both are easy to implement and add a extra layer of power to using UIWebView as a rich content display.


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Monday, June 29, 2015

UITextField docked like iOS Messenger


A while ago I was searching for code on how to create a textbar that is docked at the bottom of the screen and moves with the keyboard when the textbox is selected. Very similar behavior to what is in iOS Messenger.


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