Showing posts with label Android Development. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Android Development. Show all posts

Friday, August 26, 2016

Simple ways to improve your application Architecture


I'm an Android app development rookie, with roughly four months of coding experience. And as I've grown more and more knowledgeable of Android fundamentals, I decided to look upon my very first projects as a rookie. I realised that my starting code was sloppy and just all over the place, so recently I've been trying out a new approach to both my application and code structure, which is widely known as MVP — an abbreviation for Model-View-Presenter software architecture.


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Architecting Android with Data Binding and MVVM in mind


When Google announced Data Binding Library at last year Google I/O, I was thinking "oh man, this is the next big thing in Android development". And yeah, the hype was real (for the next two weeks), and it all kinda disappeared. My thoughts are that developers were so into MVP and Rx that they did not have any time to experiment with Data Binding. And also, you cannot "just" use Data Binding, you need to spend some time learning it and change your application's architecture to write a testable Android Application with Data Binding in mind.


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​,Android Data Binding,Android MVVM​,Architecting Android

Friday, June 26, 2015

Geofences on Android with GoogleApiClient


In this tutorial, you'll build an Android app named "AWTY?" which uses GoogleApiClient, a component of Google Play Services, to add geofences. Your users will be able to enter a name, location, and size for a desired geofence. When entering the geofence, your users will get an Android notification of a geofence crossing.


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Friday, May 16, 2014

Create a Puzzle Game for Android with the Dolby Audio API


In today's crowded mobile market, it's important to make your applications as compelling as they can possibly be. Enhancing an application's audial experience can be as appealing to the user as having a stunning user interface. The sound created by an application is a form of interaction between the user and the application that is all too often overlooked. However, this means that offering a great audial experience can help your application stand out from the crowd. Dolby Digital Plus is an advanced audio codec that can be used in mobile applications using Dolby's easy-to-use Audio API. Dolby has made its API available for several platforms, including Android and Kindle Fire. In this tutorial, we will look at the Android implementation of the API. The Dolby Audio API for Android is compatible with a wide range of Android devices. This means that your Android applications and games can enjoy high-fidelity, immersive audio with only a few minutes of work integrating Dolby's Audio API. Let's explore what it takes to integrate the API by creating a puzzle game.


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Tuesday, May 13, 2014

Introduction to Android Design Patterns


Previously, you learned about design patterns and how they applied to the iOS platform. In this article, we take a closer look at design patterns on the Android platform and they differ from design patterns on iOS. If you're unfamiliar with design patterns on Android, then this article is for you. If you haven't read my previous article about design patterns on iOS, then I encourage you to take a few minutes to read that article before continuing. Some of the concepts and terminology used in this article were introduced in Introduction to iOS Design Patterns.


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Thursday, May 8, 2014

Introduction: How to Save Data in your Android Application


This is the first post in a series explaining the various ways to save data and application state in an Android application. There are many mechanisms in the Android SDK that can be used to save data, and it is something confusing to decide which one to use and when the operation should be triggered. One of the first and easiest things you'll want to do when building your application is keeping data entered by the user and explicitly saved. Here are the most commonly used persistent storage modes:


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Tuesday, April 29, 2014

Understanding User Interface in Android - Part 1: Layouts


So far in my previous few articles on Android I have focused on showing you how to get things done in Android without really spending too much time discussing the visual aspect of Android application development - User Interface design. In this article, and the next, I will walk you through the various elements that make up the UI of an Android application. In this first part of the article, I will discuss the various layouts available in Android to position the various widgets on your screen.


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Mobile Design Practices For Android: Tips And Techniques


Android is an attractive platform for developers, but not all designers share our enthusiasm. Making an app look and feel great across hundreds of devices with different combinations of screen size, pixel density and aspect ratio is no mean feat. Android's diversity provides plenty of challenges, but creating apps that run on an entire ecosystem of devices is rewarding too.


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Monday, April 28, 2014

Streaming Video in Android Apps


The Android platform provides libraries you can use to stream media files, such as remote videos, presenting them for playback in your apps. In this tutorial, we will stream a video file, displaying it using the VideoView component together with a MediaController object to let the user control playback. We will also briefly run through the process of presenting the video using the MediaPlayer class. If you've completed the series on creating a music player for Android, you could use what you learn in this tutorial to further enhance it. You should be able to complete this tutorial if you have developed at least a few Android apps already.


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Friday, April 4, 2014

Formatting Dates with Java in Android Applications


To format dates in an Android application, you must keep in mind that dates formatted using the Android SDK take into account the locale, which includes the country and language (this is also called a culture). The locale is configured in the Settings application of the device. In general, using the locale of the device is the best option, but this may be unacceptable for enterprise applications where all users need to see the same format, regardless of the language of the device. Also, dates that are saved to a file or a database should always have the same format.


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How to make your Android projects more portable to Windows/MacOS (and vice versa)


In design phase, I had referenced iOS webkit, ZK, Xamarin, Android-Binding, PhoneGap and JavaFX. Before that, I had already had project experience in WPF ("Mother" of MVVM. while MVP is genealogically "Father") and Android UI ecosystem. This cross-platform codebase is initially developed to meet real customer requirements -- not large-scale, but quick evolving Android-Desktop projects.


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Wednesday, April 2, 2014

Responsive Android Applications


Developing a mobile application is a creative process. You want to build something beautiful and functional. Something that works well on any device. Something that delights your users. Something that you're proud of. I want to show you how I develop these kinds of applications on Android. One common misconception about Android development is that it's hard to write these kinds of applications when screen properties vary so widely. You've no doubt seen Android Fragmentation Visualized, which lists a daunting number of Android devices. The truth is, you will have to put some thought into the design, but not significantly more than you would on other platforms. Android developers have excellent tools available to support this variation in device configuration and to ensure that their applications perform beautifully on all devices. In this article, I will focus on three areas of variability in Android devices and how those variations affect the development and design of Android applications. I will cover these areas at a high level and from an iOS developer's perspective: How do Android developers optimize for minor variations in screen sizes? How are differences in width and height between devices managed? How do Android developers account for screen density variations? How are applications optimized to work well on different device categories? How can I make one app that works well on phone and tablet devices?


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Android Intents


Perhaps a very distinctive thing about Android is the ability for applications to launch other apps or easily share content. Back in the days of iOS 1.0, it quickly became obvious that applications couldn't really talk to each other (at least non-Apple applications), even after the first iOS SDK was released. Before iOS 6, attaching a photo or a video to an email you were already composing was definitely a chore. It was not until Apple added the ability in iOS 6 that this was really possible. Android, on the other hand, was designed to support this behavior since day one. There are other simple examples where it really becomes clear how different both platforms behave. Imagine the following scenario: you take a picture and want to retouch it with some image editing app, and later share it on Instagram.


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Android’s Notification Center


Notifications from our devices are almost second nature for us these days. Hardly an hour goes by that we aren't pulling out our phones, checking our status bars, and then putting our phones back in our pockets. For Android users, this is especially true, as it is one of the primary ways of interacting with their devices. Unlock your screen, read a few emails, approve some friend requests, and like your buddy's check-in, across three different applications, all directly from the notification bar. But this is an entirely different world for some. Particularly, iOS has a long history of not getting notifications quite right, and iOS developers didn't have the same kind of fine-grained control over their apps' notifications. It wasn't possible to receive silent notifications, to possibly wait and post them later. Things have changed in iOS 7, but the bad taste still remains in the mouths of some, and notifications are still lacking some key features that Android developers have been enjoying for years. It's been long touted that Android 'got' notifications right from the beginning. All of your notifications were centralized in one logical place on your phone, right in the system bar, next to your battery and signal strength settings. But to understand what Android's notification system is capable of, it's important to understand its roots, and how the system evolved. Since Android let developers fully control their own background processes, they were able to create and show notifications at any time, for any reason. There was never a notion of delivering a notification to the application or to the status bar. It was delivered wherever you wanted it. You could access this from anywhere, at any time. Since the majority of applications didn't force a fullscreen design, users could pull down the notification 'drawer' whenever they wanted. For many people, Android was their first smartphone, and this type of notification system deviated from the notification paradigm that existed before, one where you had to arduously open every single application that had information for you, whether it be missed calls, SMSes, or emails.


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SQLite Database Support in Android


Most of us are familiar with at least some of the persistence features Core Data offers us out of the box. Unfortunately, many of those things aren't automatic on the Android platform. For instance, Core Data abstracts away most of the SQL syntax and database normalization concerns facing database engineers every day. Since Android only provides a thin client to SQLite, you'll still need to write SQL and ensure your database tables are appropriately normalized. Core Data allows us to think in terms of objects. In fact, it handles marshaling and unmarshaling objects automatically. It manages to perform very well on mobile devices because it provides record-level caching. It doesn't create a separate instance of an object each time the same piece of data is requested from the store. Observation of changes to an object are possible without requiring a refresh each time the object is inspected. This isn't the case for Android. You are completely responsible for writing objects into and reading them from the database. This means you must also implement object caching (if desired), manage object instantiation, and manually perform dirty checking of any objects already in existence. With Android, you'll need to watch out for version-specific functionality. Different versions of Android ship with different implementations of SQLite. This means the exact same database instructions may give wildly different results across platform versions. A query may perform much differently based on which version of SQLite is executing it.


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Dependency Injection, Annotations, and why Java is Better Than you Think it is


That may not be shocking to you. I did help write a book full of Java code, after all. It's shocking to me, though. I wasn't a fan when I started writing Android apps, I wasn't a fan when we began the Big Nerd Ranch Guide, and I still wasn't a huge fan when we finished it. My beef was not original or well thought out, but here are my issues, roughly: It's verbose. There's no shortened syntax for implementing callbacks, like blocks or lambdas, so you have to write a lot of boilerplate to implement even a simple interface. If you need an object that holds four things, you have to create a class with four named fields. It's rigid. Writing sensible Java constantly requires you to specify exactly which exception you're catching, to specify which type you're taking in, to check and make sure that your references aren't null, and to import every class you need to use. And while there is some flexibility at runtime, it's nowhere close to what you get in the Objective-C runtime, much less something like Ruby or Python


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Android 101 for iOS Developers


As the mobile software industry evolves, it is becoming increasingly impractical to target only iOS for a mobile product. Android market share is approaching 80 percent for smartphones,1 and the number of potential users that it can bring to a product can hardly be ignored. In this article, I will introduce the core concepts of Android development within the context of iOS development. Android and iOS work on similar problem sets, but they approach many of these problems in different ways. Throughout the article, I will be using a companion project (available on GitHub) to illustrate how to accomplish the same tasks when developing for both platforms. In addition to a working knowledge of iOS development, I assume that you have a working knowledge of Java and are able to install and use the Android Development Tools. Furthermore, if you are new to Android development, reading through the tutorial by Google about building your first app could be very helpful.


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Tuesday, March 11, 2014

A Case Study of an Android* Client App Using Cloud-Based Alert Service


This case study focused on developing an Android client app for a cloud-based healthcare alert service. A doctor or a nurse would have this client app installed on an Android device. The hospital's central paging system sends short notification messages to the device. The notification plays an alert sound and shows up on the device's status bar. The user acknowledges or responds to the alert. The user could also browse all the outstanding alerts and the history. The use case was very generic; it could be easily applied to other industries.


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Saturday, March 8, 2014

Using the Accelerometer on Android


Before the dawn of smartphones, one of the few hardware components applications could interact with was the keyboard. But times have changed and interacting with hardware components is becoming more and more common. Using gestures often feels more natural than interacting with a user interface through mouse and keyboard. This is especially true for touch devices, such as smartphones and tablets. I find that using gestures can bring an Android application to life, making it more interesting and exciting for the user. In this tutorial, we'll use a gesture that you find in quite a few mobile applications, the shake gesture. We'll use the shake gesture to randomly generate six Lottery numbers and display them on the screen using a pretty animation.


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Friday, March 7, 2014

Android SDK: Working with Android Studio


The goal of this series is to learn about Android development, including the tools and resources you need to in order to start creating apps. In the last part we became acquainted with the Eclipse IDE. Since the platform began, Eclipse has been the main supported development environment used to create Android apps. Eclipse is still the recommended IDE for Android, but this is set to change with the new Android Studio IDE. Android Studio is not yet complete, but it is available as an early access preview. This new IDE is designed specifically for Android development and based on IntelliJ IDEA in conjunction with JetBrains. When it is complete, Android Studio will improve several aspects of its Android development, not the least of which is the process of designing UIs to support the range of Android devices in use. In this tutorial we will install and explore Android Studio.


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