Showing posts with label SignalR. Show all posts
Showing posts with label SignalR. Show all posts

Sunday, August 9, 2015

INSIDE SIGNALR – ADDRESSING CLIENTS, RETURN VALUES, BROKEN CONNECTIONS AND SECURITY


During my last lecture about ASP.NET SignalR in the .Net Developer Group Berlin-Brandenburg, some questions came up from the audience. I like to try to answer these questions with this blog post. The questions were about how address specific clients from the server side, how to return values after calling a function at a specific client and how broken connections are handled. And also the evergreen-question came up: How to secure SignalR applications. This post is about SignalR 2 and will not cover previous versions. You can find very good tutorials here: ASP.NET SignalR 2. Let's have a look at the questions step by step.


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This article is related to

MVC,Visual Studio 2015,SignalR,ASP.Net,Security

Tuesday, July 7, 2015

Introduction to SignalR Security


SignalR does not provide any features for authenticating users. Instead, you integrate the SignalR features into the existing authentication structure for an application. You authenticate users as you would normally in your application, and work with the results of the authentication in your SignalR code. For example, you might authenticate your users with ASP.NET forms authentication, and then in your hub, enforce which users or roles are authorized to call a method. In your hub, you can also pass authentication information, such as user name or whether a user belongs to a role, to the client. SignalR provides the Authorize attribute to specify which users have access to a hub or method. You apply the Authorize attribute to either a hub or particular methods in a hub. Without the Authorize attribute, all public methods on the hub are available to a client that is connected to the hub. For more information about hubs, see Authentication and Authorization for SignalR Hubs. You apply the Authorize attribute to hubs, but not persistent connections. To enforce authorization rules when using a PersistentConnection you must override the AuthorizeRequest method. For more information about persistent connections, see Authentication and Authorization for SignalR Persistent Connections.


I guess you came to this post by searching similar kind of issues in any of the search engine and hope that this resolved your problem. If you find this tips useful, just drop a line below and share the link to others and who knows they might find it useful too.

Stay tuned to my blogtwitter or facebook to read more articles, tutorials, news, tips & tricks on various technology fields. Also Subscribe to our Newsletter with your Email ID to keep you updated on latest posts. We will send newsletter to your registered email address. We will not share your email address to anybody as we respect privacy.


This article is related to

C#,.NET,Architect,Intermediate,.Net,Articles,SignalR

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