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Debugging With the Firefox DevTools

Over the past year I have given a presentation about using the browser for debugging client-side bugs. Throughout the presentation I would focus on using Chrome, as it's my primary browser and I just don't have the time to use multiple browsers while presenting. Now, I do suggest to others that they try out other browsers, as it can be very helpful. So here's a screencast where I'll show you a few sample applications, with some bugs, and how you can use the Firefox DevTools to debug them and compare and contrast the different tools.
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Android App Debugging

In this tutorial, we will explore the core set of debugging tools that new Android app developers need to be aware of in order to create and perfect their apps.

Part 0: Getting Started

This series of Android tutorials is meant to help you build the skills and confidence necessary to build high-quality Android apps. This tutorial is for the Java developer just getting started learning Android app development, who is somewhat familiar with Eclipse, and who has installed the Android SDK and the Android Developer Plugin for Eclipse. Also, you should know how to create a simple Android application (Hello World will suffice) in order to complete this tutorial. If you are not prepared...
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Enable Visual Studio debugging or Breakpoints for Silverlight Project.

Following are some solutions which you can apply, if your Visual Studio is not debugging your silverlight project or if your breakpoints are not hitting properly.
Solution 1: Use IE (Internet Explorer)

Solution 2:
1-Right click on the Web Application project that comes with Silverlight project
2-From the context menu, chose "Properties". This will open the properties window in the screen.
3-Select web from left menu and scroll down to the end and select checkbox of silverlight.

Solution 3:
Attach the process of silverlight to Internet explorer.

Solution 4:
1-Clean VS Project.
2-Close IDE.
3-Remove all bin and debug folder from project
4-Remove .XAP file from ClientBin folder
5-Start IDE and press F5 to start debugging.

Solution 5:
Try to reset the Visual Studio settings by calling the "devenv /resetsettings" command. This is not recomended untill you have failed all solutions.

Solution 6:
Remove Solution User Options (.suo) file  present in your solution directory.

I guess you …

Debugging WinRT/XAML bindings

Visual Studio 2012 may not (yet?) support debugging of XAML bindings debugging in WinRT/Metro-style applications in a way we're used to from programming WPF and Silverlight (a.k.a. XAML breakpoints), but basic notifications of failed bindings in the output window seems to be present and working.

Let's look at the basic set up (new blank application).

MainPage.xaml – DataContext is set to the same page class to keep it simple; TextBlock's text is bound to a MyBinding property.

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Visual Studio Keyboard Shortcuts

Visual Studio has over 450 keyboard shortcuts. The most useful of which are listed below. The keyboard shortcuts are categorized by the Visual Studio activity:
Switching between Windows within Visual Studio:
Ctrl+F6 – switch between the panes   in the  main code editing window.Shift+Alt+Enter – full-screen mode toggle.Alt+F6/Alt +Shift+F6 – move cursor from the main editing window to the   docked windows such as  Properties, Help,   Server Explorer  etc.F7 – Move to the Code Behind editing page.Editing:




Ctrl+Shift+V – cycle through the items saved onto the clipboard ring.Ctrl+- (Ctrl + Hyphen) – navigate between pages (as in Internet Explorer). Use Shift Ctrl+- to move in the opposite directionBlock Selection: – hit Alt and then select the highlight the area.Line No in Code – Tools>Options>Text Editor>All Languages>General>Line numbers.F4: Property WindowCtrl+Alt+L – Open and show the Solution ExplorerCtrl+Alt+O – Open and show the Visual…

Visual Studio Debugging Tutorial – Basics

If there’s a single feature of Visual Studio that every developer uses and is essential to the development process it is the built-in debugger.
Debugging can be commenced by clicking the green arrow button in the VS toolbar, selecting Debug-Strart Debugging from the menu, or hitting F5. Before commencing debugging you will need to select what exactly you are debugging, just starting debugging will commence the project from the default point. For a Web Forms app, if you want to start from another page other the default start page right click the page and select Set As Start Page. For a Win Forms app set the start Form in the application properties window first.
Prior to debugging, it will almost always be necessary to to set some breakpoints. Breakpoints pause the execution of the code and allow developers to examine controls and variables before allowing the program to continue to execute. Set a breakpoint by clicking in the margin of the code editor to and a red ball with …

Exception classes

When writing any piece of software, at some stage errors occur when the application is run. This is through no fault in the programming of the code, but rather through unexpected actions on the part of the user. Unexpected actions may include selecting a file that does not exist or entering a letter where a number is expected. These unexpected actions can be handled in one of two ways, either by preemptive programming or by using exceptions. The .NET Framework provides an Exception class in the System namespace to handle exceptions.
Preemptive programming requires the programmer to think about everything that could possibly go wrong when the application is run. Let us consider the first of the two examples cited above. To find out if a file exists, we can invoke the Exists() function of the File class, passing to it the string supplied to us by the user:
if( !File.Exists(file_name))
{
// The source file does not exist
}
else
{
// The source file exists
}The if statement catches the…