Showing posts with label Windows Store Apps. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Windows Store Apps. Show all posts

Wednesday, October 16, 2013

Grouping with the GridView Control - Windows Store Apps (XAML)

Representing data within Windows Store apps, grouping the data often is a very useful and appealing option. Visual Studio also offers a ready to use template to display grouped data by using the GridView control. Other than the default look that's given by the Visual Studio template, there are nearly endless possibilities. This article gives information on the templates of the GridView control and how they can be used to change the look of grouping data.


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C#,.NET,Architect,Intermediate,VS2010,.Net,Articles,Computer Tutorials,Windows Store Apps,XAML

Friday, June 14, 2013

Data Storage for Windows Store Apps - a Walkthrough

With the Q2 Release of RadControls for Windows 8 we announced a new Data Storage framework that fills the gap of a local database solution missing in Windows 8/RT. Our solution is based on the well-established SQLite engine but provides additional functionality. Particularly, we implemented a LINQ to SQLite provider and some simple ORM features for the .NET Framework on top of it. On the JavaScript and HTML 5 side, the ORM capabilities are wrapped by a lightweight library which allows JavaScript developers to take advantage of the local database storage using JS objects and standard SQL expressions.


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</ span>Architect,Intermediate,Articles,Computer Tutorials, Telerik, RadControls, Windows Store Apps

Monday, June 10, 2013

Simple Validation with MVVM for Windows Store apps

Developers who are writing Windows Store apps using C# and XAML might find some of the support for Model-View-ViewModel (MVVM) lacking. Both WPF and Silverlight provided specific interfaces that enabled you to store validation context about fields on a context and even supported asynchronous validation. Although there are some existing frameworks that provide this support, such as Prism for the Windows Runtime, it is also fairly simple and straightforward to roll your own.


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</ span>C#,.NET,Architect,Intermediate,VS2010,.Net,Articles,Computer Tutorials,MVVM,Windows Store apps

Monday, May 27, 2013

Watermark TextBox in Windows Store apps

A common request for WSAs is to add a "watermark" to TextBox entries so users get a hint as to what is expected in the TextBox. You can see this in many Search Charm implementations as it allows a search hint to be provided via the SearchPane.PlaceHolderText property. However, the built-in TextBox in XAML doesn't have this feature (HTML does!).


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</ span>C#,.NET,Architect,Intermediate,VS2010,.Net,Articles,Computer Tutorials,Windows Store apps

Quick Tip: Processing HTML Content in Windows Store Apps

The WebView control allows you to display content from sites in your app using a small window that renders the HTML using the same rendering engine as Internet Explorer. It does have some limitations and most likely if you are providing content in your app, your goal is to augment your app with fresh data rather than try to superimpose a full-blown web application on your own native Windows Store app. Trying to strip down content can be quite cumbersome once you wade through the myriad RegEx expressions or other utilities available. Here's a simple trick that will work with most content-oriented sites like blogs and online magazines. It allows you to get a more basic view of the content and present it without all of the bells and whistles you may end up pulling down with regular content.


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</ span>C#,.NET,Architect,Intermediate,VS2010,.Net,Articles,Computer Tutorials, Web Development, Web, HTML, HTML5,Windows Store Apps

Wednesday, May 22, 2013

Quick Tip: Processing HTML Content in Windows Store Apps

The WebView control allows you to display content from sites in your app using a small window that renders the HTML using the same rendering engine as Internet Explorer. It does have some limitations and most likely if you are providing content in your app, your goal is to augment your app with fresh data rather than try to superimpose a full-blown web application on your own native Windows Store app. Trying to strip down content can be quite cumbersome once you wade through the myriad RegEx expressions or other utilities available. Here's a simple trick that will work with most content-oriented sites like blogs and online magazines. It allows you to get a more basic view of the content and present it without all of the bells and whistles you may end up pulling down with regular content.


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</ span>C#,.NET,Architect,Intermediate,VS2010,.Net,Articles,Computer Tutorials, HTML, Windows Store Apps

Monday, April 29, 2013

Step by Step working with Windows Azure Mobile Service Data in XAML based Windows Store Apps

In this post we will take a look on working with Windows Azure Mobile Service in XAML based Windows Store Application. We will follow step by step approach to learn goodness of Windows Azure Mobile Service. In first part of post we will configure Windows Azure Mobile Service in Azure portal. In second part of post we will create a simple XAML based Windows Store application to insert records in data table. This is first post of this series and in further posts we will learn other features of Windows Azure Mobile Services.


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</ span>.NET,Architect,Intermediate,VS2010,.Net,Articles,Computer Tutorials,Windows Azure Mobile Service,XAML,Windows Store Apps

Wednesday, March 27, 2013

Windows Store Apps: A Guide for WPF and Silverlight Developers, Part 1

Windows Runtime, or WinRT, is the new Microsoft framework for building Windows Store apps targeting Windows 8. Windows Runtime supports development in C#, Visual Basic .NET and C++ as well as JavaScript. Windows Store apps run on both x86, x64 and Windows RT platforms without modification. These apps can run on both tablets and Windows 8 desktop computers. Windows Store apps can't run on Windows Phone 8, however. You can write apps for Windows 8 and Windows RT that share code and look the same to users on each device because each has a Windows Runtime, a core CLR and similar XAML UI vocabularies; but you still need to build them as two different apps and publish them to two different stores: the Windows Store and the Windows Phone Store. Because of the differences in the APIs, you'll also need to modify and adapt some code—UI design in particular—to the different form factors and resolutions. This article is the first of two I'm writing for Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF) and Silverlight developers who are creating Windows Store apps. This first one is more theoretical, whereas the second is more practically oriented. In this first article, I explain some of the new features in Windows Runtime andthe most common differences you'll encounter when transitioning to Windows Store app development, coming from a world of either Windows Phone 7, WPF/Silverlight or even traditional .NET development. (For a comprehensive list of changes, see the .NET for Windows Store apps overview.)


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</ span>C#,.NET,Architect,Intermediate,VS2010,.Net,Articles,Computer Tutorials,Windows Store Apps,WPF,Silverlight

Windows Store Apps: A Guide for WPF and Silverlight Developers, Part 2

This is my second article for Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF) and Silverlight developers who want to start creating Windows Store apps without compromising on architecture. I assume you've read Part 1; this article continues where that one left off and is a lot more practical than the first. The bulk of this article consists of two tutorials: one for setting up a new project using the Model-View-ViewModel (MVVM) pattern and one for using MVVM navigation. Before getting to the tutorials, however, I want to briefly review some of the key concepts of the MVVM pattern. To get the most out of this article, you should have some knowledge of the MVVM pattern. (Those of you familiar with MVVM can skip right to the tutorials.) If you want to know about MVVM in more detail than what I provide, you can easily find a wealth of information on the Web. MVVM is a common and popular pattern used in developing apps for WPF/Silverlight, Windows Phone 7 and Windows Store. The MVVM pattern is all about cleanly separating the view, its logic and the model in order to create an architecture that is maintainable, scalable and testable. The following sections describe the various components of MVVM.


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</ span>C#,.NET,Architect,Intermediate,VS2010,.Net,Articles,Computer Tutorials,Windows Store Apps,WPF,Silverlight

Tuesday, March 26, 2013

Using XAML with DirectX and C++ in Windows Store Apps

Since Windows Vista, DirectX has been the core graphics API for the Windows platform, enabling graphics processing unit (GPU) acceleration for all OS screen-drawing operations. However, until Windows 8, DirectX developers had to roll their own UI frameworks from the ground up in native C++ and COM, or license a middleware UI package such as Scaleform. In Windows 8, you can bridge the gap between native DirectX and a proper UI framework with the DirectX-XAML interop feature of the Windows Runtime (WinRT). To take advantage of the API support for XAML in DirectX, you're required to use "native" C++ (although you have access to smart pointers and the C++ component extensions). A little basic knowledge of COM helps as well, although I'll spell out the specific interop you must perform to bring the XAML framework and DirectX operations together.


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</ span>XAML, DirectX, C++, Windows Store Apps, .Net,Architect,Intermediate,VS2010 ,Articles,Computer Tutorials