Showing posts with label WebAPIs Version. Show all posts
Showing posts with label WebAPIs Version. Show all posts

Thursday, July 23, 2015

Best Practices for Designing a Pragmatic RESTful API


Your data model has started to stabilize and you're in a position to create a public API for your web app. You realize it's hard to make significant changes to your API once it's released and want to get as much right as possible up front. Now, the internet has no shortage on opinions on API design. But, since there's no one widely adopted standard that works in all cases, you're left with a bunch of choices: What formats should you accept? How should you authenticate? Should your API be versioned?


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C#,.NET,Architect,Intermediate,WebAPIs,WebAPIs Version,.Net,Articles,Computer Tutorials

Wednesday, July 22, 2015

Versioning RESTful Services


I've talked about this in various venues and also cover it in my Pluralsight REST Fundamentals course, but the topic of how to version RESTful services has been popping up a bunch recently on some of the ASP.NET Web API discussion lists, and my friend Daniel Roth asked if I could serialize some of that presentation content into a blog post – so here goes. First, note that while the focus here is on RESTful services and not just HTTP services, the same principles can potentially apply to HTTP services that are not fully RESTful (for example, HTTP services that do not use hypermedia as a state transition mechanism).


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C#,.NET,Architect,Intermediate,WebAPIs,WebAPIs Version,.Net,Articles,Computer Tutorials

How are REST APIs versioned?


It seems that there are a number of people recommending using Content-Negotiation (the HTTP "Accept:" header) for API versioning. However, none of the big public REST APIs I have looked at seem to be using this approach. They almost exclusively put the API version number in the URI, with the odd exception using a custom HTTP header. I am at somewhat of a loss to explain this disconnect.


I guess you came to this post by searching similar kind of issues in any of the search engine and hope that this resolved your problem. If you find this tips useful, just drop a line below and share the link to others and who knows they might find it useful too.

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C#,.NET,Architect,Intermediate,WebAPIs,WebAPIs Version,.Net,Articles,Computer Tutorials

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